225 Seven Farms Drive Suite 105 Daniel Island, SC  29492

Tel: 843-971-4460

Surgical Dermatology

Actinic keratoses

Actinic keratoses are precancerous growths that occur from cumulative sun damage. They are treated with cryotherapy and topical prescription creams. If left untreated, actinic keratoses may progress to squamous cell carcinoma. Patients with actinic keratoses have a higher risk of developing other skin cancers as well and should wear sunscreen regularly and avoid the sun when possible. They should also have regular skin exams performed by a board-certified dermatologist.

Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common type of skin cancer. SCCs most commonly arise in sun exposed areas but may develop in non-sun exposed areas and within scars also. Prognosis is generally good if diagnosed and treated early, but they can metastasize. SCCs are usually surgically removed; superficial SCCs may sometimes be treated with electrodessication and curettage or with a prescription cream in select cases. Patients with a history of skin cancer are at increased risk for developing additional skin cancers and should have regular skin exams performed by a board-certified dermatologist.

Basal Cell Carcinoma

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common type of skin cancer. BCCs are typically limited to sun exposed areas. They very rarely metastasize; however, they are locally destructive without treatment and can cause significant damage to surrounding skin and even underlying muscle and bone if neglected. BCCs are usually surgically removed; superficial BCCs may sometimes be treated with electrodessication and curettage or with a prescription cream in select cases. Patients with a history of skin cancer are at increased risk for developing additional skin cancers and should have regular skin exams performed by a board-certified dermatologist.

Malignant Melanoma

Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer. It can occur on sun exposed and non-sun exposed skin. Early detection is critical, as early melanomas carry a much better prognosis than advanced melanomas. Patients with a history of melanoma are at increased risk for developing additional melanomas and should have regular skin exams performed by a board-certified dermatologist. A family history of melanoma, red hair, fair or freckled skin, and a history of significant sun exposure, blistering sunburns, or tanning bed use increase the risk of developing melanoma, and patients with risk factors should see their board-certified dermatologist for regular skin exams. Any mole that grows, changes color, bleeds, or ulcerates, as well as any new suspicious mole, should be evaluated promptly.

Dysplastic Nevi

Dysplastic nevi are moles with atypical cells. The cells compromising dysplastic moles range from mildly abnormal to severely abnormal, and treatment is dictated by the degree of atypia. Patients with many dysplastic nevi have an increased risk of developing melanoma and should have regular skin exams performed by a board-certified dermatologist.

 
 
 
 
 
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